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Grandpa's Garden Rose

Grandpa’s Garden Rose

Mr Bee & his destination

Mr Bee & his destination

Parent on final nerve from crying crow baby

Parent on final nerve from crying crow baby

What parent has not got to the point that the child needs to fly from the nest and become an adult. This happens earlier for crow babies than humans.   Enjoy the little video showing how the parent is trying to wean the baby but the little one is having nothing of it.

Essence of life shining from Morning Glory

Essence of life shining from Morning Glory

I was shocked when I got home & reviewed my photos to see how these sweet Morning Glorys glow.  I believe I have captured their life essence.  Everything on this earth has it and this is a rare peek.

This weekend was a minus tide here in the Puget Sound.  When I went to my local West Seattle beach I found that it had been turned into a Crow family day.   Crow parents had brought their youngsters to the tidal area to learn how to forage for themselves.  Ask them how well that was going?   Baby crows are begging machines.  At this stage they can find a few things but any time a parent gets food they are right there in their face crying for a snack.

More exciting was I spotted one of my gimpy crows with a baby.   Nothing has stopped this crow, not even a damaged foot.  This particular crow lives up off Marine View Drive and I have seen her there more often than at the beach.  When she does show up on the beach and I am feeding the masses she usually gets a bite but is very careful.   She is a ballerina on her one leg and lets everyone know around her what she wants.   Here is a link to a prior post highlighting her.  http://wp.me/p1d1cX-4V

Now the big proof that she can survive with one leg is her little one trailing along at the Beach Family Day.   This video not only shows you how she gets around on one leg but just how impish Baby Crows are at this stage in their development.

Magnolia Tree Blooms on Earth

Magnolia Tree Blooms on Earth

Wood grain in cement -

Wood grain captured forever

Tree Love

Tree Love

Tree Love

This Fir and Maple are wrapped around each other from their roots to their crowns.   They live in each others arms and limbs… hence Tree Love.

Osprey posing in madrona after meal

Osprey posing in madrona after meal

Tis the Season of the Osprey starts with my trip to the beach last weekend.  I was sauntering along and saw a big bird swooping by the trees.   I had my camera out and started taking pictures.   Those in flight were not so good but when he landed in a Madrona snag I could see he had a fish.  Yikes, he then proceeded to eat it.  Enjoy the video and still photos of his dinner with Mr. Fish.

That experience made me go back to the Duwamish Park called Herring House Park (Tualtwx).  Here is a link to my visit almost exactly a year ago.

http://wp.me/p1d1cX-Es

This area is still a conundrum of nature, industrial and homelessness.   This time I brought my small tripod and got some good photos of that mom feeding her baby.   Note how she has the white head and the baby is all brown with the beginnings of his markings.

Osprey on Duwamish feeding baby

Osprey on Duwamish feeding baby

As you can see this nest is on a light pole.  It is in the middle of a busy metal recycler and the next photos give you a perspective of how it sits.

Osprey Nest on Duwamish junk yard light pole

Osprey Nest on Duwamish junk yard light pole

Seattle and Osprey Nest on Duwamish

Seattle and Osprey Nest on Duwamish

After I left Herring House I went South to where Hamm Creek enters the Duwamish.  I had meant to go there for a long time.  It is only up the road from where I used to live.  Here is a link to a longer article I published on the Duwamish with some photos of my little trailer home by the river.

http://wp.me/p1d1cX-G7

But back to Hamm Creek.   It was disgusting.  It was full of litter, party trash and homeless looking areas.   I had my mace in hand the whole time and will not go back.  However, as I pushed through the bushes to the shore past the trash and swampy areas I was given a treat.   There in the distance next to a huge transmission power tower someone had built an Osprey platform.   Check out how it has a resident bird.

Power Osprey keeping home safe

Power Osprey keeping home safe

Powerline Tower with Osprey Nest

Power-line Tower with Osprey Nest

I don’t have a picture of the other nest I know of.  It is along I-405 in Renton next to a cell tower. They have built this family a platform to keep them off the tower.   They are sitting there again this year and I see one of the parents flying over the car dealers on Grady Way each evening when I drive home.   Ironically, this bird in Renton is close to the old Black River which disappeared when Lake Washington was lowered.   The Black River flowed into the Duwamish, so this nest is also related to our city’s river.

There you have it – The season of the Osprey for 2014 intertwined with the Duwamish.

Crow Family of Fort Lawton between old Stables

Crow Family of Fort Lawton between old Stables

A few weeks ago during my week off I visited Discovery Park.   This Park was Fort Lawton before it was donated to the City of Seattle as a park in 1973.

Where ever I go I find the resident crows or rather they find me.  As you know from my earlier posts, Crows are very family and territory orientated.  They stick together in large extended families and stay in their own home areas.   This leads me to my theory that this flock has been resident in this area for many years.   Their ancestors must date back to pre-fort but certainly to the military’s presence. Fort Lawton opened in February 1900, so this family at least must be over 100 years old.  They would have found great food opportunity and an abundance of fir trees to raise their young then.

For some reason until this visit to old Fort Lawton and seeing them around the grounds did I connect the dots of Crow Family heritage.   We humans think we have the corner on generational life but birds and animals must also have this.   Think about pedigree papered dogs and cats.   My girl kitty is a papered Maine Coon.  Gigi’s family tree dates back five generations.   Why not our super smart Crows?  They exhibit all the family traits of social organizations.   Group care of young, parents keeping children near them for years, and older birds are mourned when they die.  So, I say this flock is not just a random group of birds but the long-term crow family of Fort Lawton.   Enjoy a few more pictures of them:

Next let me show you the world our Crow Family lives in and some of the history behind it.

Stairway to Fort Lawton's past.

Stairway to Fort Lawton’s past.

These buildings were the heart of Fort Lawton life.  They face a large field that still exists between the hill that contains officers row and them.  Can you see the crow family finding this a good home to raise their family?

Check out the postcard how it shows the Post Exchange and the Band House.   100 years later they still exist even if they are mothballed by the city to protect them.  Will we revive them some day?  That would be an investment in preserving our history here.

The officers had beautiful Victorian style homes for their families.  Very unlike the enlisted man who lived in barracks.  Those barracks were torn down years ago along with many other buildings.  However, officers row still exists and is about to be sold off.  There is quite a dispute going on about how these houses can be sold to private owners in the middle of a city park.   Not sure I would want to live with people roaming around like me taking pictures and enjoying the park.

View from Officers Row -  see Post Exchange, Olympics and Puget Sound

View from Officers Row – see Post Exchange, Band House, Guard building and Puget Sound

This view is spectacular looking down from the officers hill home site.   You can see all the way to the sound and gives one a perspective of the historic district.   Can you imagine the soldiers living here 100 years ago in what was a wilderness at the time?  They carved a life out of the forest miles from the City of Seattle.

The backside of any place shows the real working person’s life.    The teamsters house was near the stables where our crow family was playing.   In those days teamsters were those who tended to the horses and wagons.   Automobiles and trucks had just started to enter the lives of the common man.  The Teamsters Union formed around the time Fort Lawton was built and perhaps some of these military teamsters joined that cause when they left the service.

WACs arrive at Fort Lawton during WWII.  Wonder if my mom is there?

WACs arrive at Fort Lawton during WWII. Wonder if my mom is there?

This picture caught my eye of WACs marching during WWII apx 1943.   I thought I saw my mother in the group.  However, upon reading the info on when this was, I think she was either at Basic Training in Georgia or in New Mexico.   This was only a few months before WACs were given full recognition.  We have her papers from that monumental event showing she was at Clovis Air Force Base.  But then again one of these ladies sure looks like her & perhaps they sent her there before going to Georgia.

See how our history is woven together.   Crows must have the same, we just don’t relate on the same plane.

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